So today we were going to Calumet (below)

We were told that we were having a lighting session but instead Jason Harry (above) was there to give us a talk about how to get into and survive in the industry. All I can say is I thought it was a brilliant talk and I’ve taken a lot away from it and so as to remember I am going to now state a check list based on his advice.

So be prepared for the most awesome list of advice EVER!

 BE PREPARED FOR ANYTHING WITH YOU’RE EQUIPMENT

 
                       Make sure batteries are always charged, that you have back-ups and fail

                       safes for everything. Have a digital version of your portfolio to hand when

                       meeting clients/prospective employers/other industry professionals. 

 THINK OF YOURSELF AS A BUISNESS


                       You need to make sure you’re incomings are higher than you’re outgoings

                        or you’re going to fail in this career. If you’ve got to hire something

                        (equipment, props, location etc) make sure you are charging the client for

                        all of these.

 KEEP YOURSELF CURRENT AND UP TO DATE ON WHAT IS POPULAR NOW

                        No one is going to hire you if your work looks outdated or not matching

                        what’s currently selling. You need to be looking at the photographers who

                        are big in your field of interest and see how they are shooting. That way 

                        you can be doing what’s going to get you the jobs.

 GET AS MUCH EXPERIENCE AS YOU  CAN AND LEARN FROM OTHERS

                         Even if it means offering to clean their studios and begging other

                         photographers to just let you watch them work. It allows you to also

                         see how they go about what they do in the ways of setting up, talking

                         to clients and directing others. You’ll learn more watching them work than

                         just being told what to do.

 NO DOES NOT MEAN NO


                        If you want to go into somewhere and shoot just go ask inside. If they say

                         no then ask again. Ask it in different ways. If you’re a student make sure 

                         you point it out to them. Don’t give in and give them money. Most people

                         will eventually say yes. Just remember no does not mean no.

      So I feel l learned a lot from him that will help me in the future. I think that Jason Harry’s work is impeccable and he is most definitely going onto my list of inspirational photographers. You totally should check him out at jasonharry.com

(Source: jasonharry.com)

A lecturer was listing out some photographers to us and one of the names I happened to Jot down was Diane Arbus. So I came home and got started researching into their work. After having a look through Diane’s work I have to be honest and say that really I don’t like it. I don’t like her style at all. I’m not saying it’s not good but I don’t personally like it. I can’t quite put my finger on it but I just don’t find them visually pleasing. I don’t find her very inspirational, personally I hope I don’t produce anything that looks like that. But maybe that’s because I like to feel the emotion from an image and I don’t really get that with her stuff.

And now I’m waffling so it’s probably time to shut off the brain.

Oh, you can view Diane Arbus’s work here —-> 

http://diane-arbus-photography.com

When it comes to photographic fields of interest I don’t really have just one; I like to dip my toe into everything! I love photographing people, animals, flowers, landscape, products, objects, fashion…anything I can get my lens on!

So thinking about that I guess a big inspiration to me is Anna Gay, an American photographer who started it out as just a hobbie but was able to turn it into her full time career. I love how she wont restrict herself to one field, how she wants to do it all. I feel like I can relate to her in that sense. I feel that all her photos give a sense of feeling, of emotion, they draw you in. This is what I constantly try to achieve, sometimes I manage it, others I don’t, but I know I must try, try and try again. You can’t succeed if you don’t put in the effort.

She did a one photo a day project, a photo of anything but at least one a day. As of the 24th of September 2012 I am going to try and take at least one interesting photo a day.

To view examples of Anna Gay’s work please look here —->   http://www.annagayphotography.com/#!portfolio/cfvg

"I want to know what you look like. I want to see your face and use your eyes."
— Preface to “FOTOLOG” book by Nick Currie